This photo taken in 2012, provided by the Centre for Social Learning 

This photo taken in 2012, provided by the Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution Scottish Primate Research Group and the journal Science shows monkeys from Noha group feeding on pink-dyed corn in South Africa. Some wild animals seem to follow the same monkey-see, monkey-do social conformity in the quest for good food that people do, a new study finds. Monkeys in South Africa instantly switched food choices _ to something they used to avoid _ purely because of peer pressure, like teenagers in high school, scientists say. And generations of humpback whales off the coast of New England learned a new feeding technique from watching what worked for one of them, according to two studies in Thursday's journal Science. (AP Photo/Erica van de Waal, Science) Science
Associated Press
This photo taken in 2012, provided by the Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution Scottish Primate Research Group and the journal Science shows monkeys from Noha group feeding on pink-dyed corn in South Africa. Some wild animals seem to follow the same monkey-see, monkey-do social conformity in the quest for good food that people do, a new study finds. Monkeys in South Africa instantly switched food choices _ to something they used to avoid _ purely because of peer pressure, like teenagers in high school, scientists say. And generations of humpback whales off the coast of New England learned a new feeding technique from watching what worked for one of them, according to two studies in Thursday's journal Science. (AP Photo/Erica van de Waal, Science) Science
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