Japan tsunami debris

Associated Press
FILE - This file photo taken March 13, 2011, and provided by the U.S. Navy, shows a Japanese home adrift in the Pacific Ocean, days after a massive earthquake and the ensuing tsunami hit Japan's east coast. Scientists believe ocean waves carried away 3-4 million tons of the 20 million tons of debris created by tsunamis that slammed into Japan after a magnitude-9.0 earthquake nearly a year ago. One-to-two million tons of it _ lumber and other construction material, fishing boats and other fragments of coastal towns _ are still in the water and are being carried across the Pacific by ocean currents. One to five percent of that may reach coastlines in Hawaii, Alaska, Oregon and Washington states. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Dylan McCord)

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Debris from Japan's 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster continues to wash ashore on the west coast of the United States. The strangest item found so far: live fish. The fish, which live off the coast of Japan and Hawaii, apparently made their way across the Pacific in a drifting skiff. Of the five fish that made the journey, one is still alive and is being kept at the Seaside Aquarium in Oregon. (AP)

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